Changes in Apple’s iCloud Security Policies and Argument of China

Changes in Apple’s iCloud Security Policies – Apple announced to relocating the encryption key for users data in China; from the United States of America to some country in Asia!

The latest chaos in the digital world regarding Apple has stricken like a bullet, as the iPhone manufacturer announced to relocating the encryption key for users data in China; from the United States of America to some country in Asia!

Well, some security advocates argue that this is incorrect for the corporation itself as well as a privacy threat for users, but according to Apple Company; the codes are secure.
According to the reports, the users of iCloud in China are confused that in what way Apple will manage the confidentiality of their essential data.

Apple too fears that data protection employees have concerns about changing the privacy of iCloud users in China, as per two reports this week.
The classified data such as online emails, photographs, and messages stay protected from hackers by encryption. And now, Apple will store encryption keys in China instead of the United States of America (Reuters and the Wall Street Journal reports).

It means that the Chinese authorities do not need to go to USA law agencies to force Apple to provide the rights to the data. This step in reaction to newly introduced laws in China, according to which iCloud services offered to the citizens, should secure data within premises of the country and can be used by Chinese organizations.

By the end of the coming month, Apple is going to start transmitting coded information to China and will work closely with a Chinese government. Apple did not say when the encryption data keys would move abroad.

Data protection advocates said, “The change can cause problems for political and other dissidents”.
“Given that Apple is going to work in China, it is unlikely that government can get access to Apple’s data from the local community,” said the professor at the Toronto University, studying the actions of the Chinese government carefully.

Apple says, however, that the data keys stored in a secure place, still Apple will control them. Besides, Apple also claimed that it would provide data only on demand to China’s current legislative requirements and did not create loopholes for access.
Apple’s high-level officer said to news agencies that iCloud is a matter of concern for the recently introduced laws.

The spokeswoman also noted that Apple decision to break the service of iCloud in China would lead to reduced client’s interaction with Apple and would reduce the security and confidentiality of data for Chinese users.
Big multinationals like Microsoft and Amazon also work with Chinese companies to provide cloud storage service and use the vast Chinese market. Two technological giants of USA refused to inform the magazine, where the encryption keys of the company’s data store.
Apple informed the news agencies that they sent a warning about the transition to Chinese iCloud users, which will allow them to disable iCloud to avoid data storage in the country. Apple also told that no one will be touched before accepting new terms of use in China.
Users whose configurations allow another nation like Macao and Hong Kong have not registered their data on servers in China.

The Reuters also includes Taiwan in this list; the newspaper does not do this.
Apple Company and Amazon did not respond to our request for additional comments yet. Microsoft also denied giving any further comments.

Written by Ali Qamar, Founder/Chief Editor at Cyberogism.com

Ali QamarAuthor Bio:
Ali Qamar is a privacy and cyber security enthusiast, his work has been featured in many major tech and security blogs including InfosecInstitute, Hackread, ValueWalk, Intego, and SecurityAffairs to name a few. He runs SpyAdvice.com currently. Follow Ali on Twitter @AliQammar57

 

 

Pierluigi Paganini

(Security Affairs – Apple iCloud, China)

The post Changes in Apple’s iCloud Security Policies and Argument of China appeared first on Security Affairs.



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